Typical day of a Real Estate Agent

Real estate agents assist people through the process of buying, selling and renting land, homes and other properties. In addition to staying current with real estate laws and trends, real estate agents are tasked with a multitude of daily duties and responsibilities, from lead generation and marketing, to open houses and property closings. One of the appealing aspects of working as a real estate agent is that each day is different, and responding to the changing needs of buyers and sellers often means shifting gears at the last minute. Although every day is unique, there are some activities that may be typical in a day in the life of a real estate agent.

Working with Clients

Whether working on behalf of buyers or sellers, real estate agents typically spend time each day working directly with clients. A seller’s agent, for example, may spend time preparing a listing presentation, taking digital photographs of the property and staging the home so it shows well. A buyer’s agent, on the other hand, may spend time combing through the MLS to find appropriate listings, printing or emailing the listings to the potential buyers and showing the property to interested buyers. Real estate agents also accompany clients to inspections, meetings with loan officers, closings and other activities where their presence is either required or requested.

Meetings and Tours
Regular office meetings allow agents to share their new listings, update other agents on price reductions and discuss buyers’ needs, and can help agents line up buyers and sellers.

Some agents participate in MLS tours to view a number of new listings each week or each month. This can help agents narrow the search for a buyer since they have seen the properties firsthand and can share detailed information with buyers. Likewise, an MLS tour can be beneficial to agents who are working with sellers: after seeing the competition, it may be easier to determine a good listing price for the seller’s property.

Real estate agents balance their time between daily administrative duties and income-producing activities. Often, this means spending time at the real estate office (or a home office), meeting with clients, staging or showing homes and traveling. Most agents have a long and varied list of daily duties and responsibilities that can change with little or no notice. As a result, there may be no such thing as a typical day in the life of a real estate agent – an aspect of the job many agents find attractive.

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Mortgage before marriage? You got it!

After eight years of dating, Greg Hebert and Laura Reiffarth knew it was time to take their commitment to each other to the next level. In June 2012, they took the plunge — and bought a home together.

The couple, who have recently gotten engaged, knew then that they would eventually get married, but buying a house first seemed like the right step for them.

“We knew we couldn’t afford to do both at the time, so we had to make a decision,” Reiffarth says. “We felt it was financially and logically smarter to buy the house first.”

It’s a decision more couples are now making. A recent survey by Coldwell Banker found that 1 in 4 married couples between the ages of 18 and 34 purchased a first home together before marriage.

The trend follows the increase in cohabitation documented by the 2010 census and in a recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC study found that nearly half of women up to age 44 had cohabitated between 2006 and 2010, compared with 34% in 1995. It also found that 40% of those couples got married within three years of living together.

And for Hebert and Reiffarth, it made more sense from a relationship perspective to buy the house, then tie the knot.

“It’s kind of funny for us to think about how our parents did it,” Reiffarth says. “We look at getting married before moving in together as a huge risk. What if you were married, moved in together and then couldn’t stand the other person? Then you’re kind of stuck, just spent a lot of money on a marriage and a house.”

Changing attitudes
Psychotherapist Robi Ludwig, who worked with Coldwell Banker on the homebuying study, says couples who are purchasing homes together are definitely commitment-minded, but that the difficult economy has prompted a shift in priorities.

“You have a population that has to be more aware of fiscal realities and responsibilities, and there is kind of more of a sober attitude when it comes to making pragmatic decisions,” she says. “Couples are deciding, ‘We are committed,’ and it makes sense to save money.

“I don’t think you can separate out the economic and fiscal realities with how couples decide to move forward in their lives,” she says. “How they handle finances will have a huge impact on their relationships. It’s not romantic, but it’s real.”

After they married, the couple built a home in Hyde Park, Ohio, and Bhattacharjee says she is glad they waited.

“We were more established in our careers and had more disposable income so we could afford exactly what we wanted,” she says.

Testing the relationship
But for some people, buying a home signifies a much bigger commitment than getting married.

“Owning five or six hundred thousand dollars of property together may actually be a stronger bond, one that can be harder to disentangle, than many marriages, which can often be dissolved rather quickly and easily with a no-fault divorce,” says Barry Maher, a motivational speaker who owns two homes in California with his partner, Rose Fennel.

The couple had lived together for eight years before they made their first co-purchase.

“Living together in a rental home was a commitment, certainly much more of a commitment than dating,” he says. “But obviously, it wasn’t nearly as strong a commitment as marriage. All it would have taken for either of us to get out of the relationship was a U-Haul, a couple of friends and a few trips lugging our stuff to a new location.

“But buying a home together is a major commitment, with promises that have to be kept and major consequences if they aren’t,” Maher says. “Just the fact that we were willing to commit to buying that property showed how strongly we were committed to making the relationship work.”

Ryan Lau and his fiancée, Leina Yokota, bought a house together in Honolulu in September 2012 because it made financial sense, but found that the process was a good test of their relationship.

“A Realtor will tell you the top three things to consider before you buy are location, location, location,” he says. “I say, before you decide to buy with your significant other you need communication, communication, communication. Our plan was one that evolved as we went through this process. We listened to each other, were honest with each other and revised our plan as we went along.”

Alaskan cruise vs. Mediterranean cruise.

Having choices like this in life is a blessing, the question is, do you prefer to climb a glacier or relax in the warm sun? Maybe we can help you decide…

ALASKAN CRUISE

From the blue ice of massive glacial fields to the stunning grandeur of the scenery and wildlife, everything in Alaska is big, bold and absolutely breathtaking. Plus you may get to see 30 foot whales, chill on an glacier, visit beautiful gardens and Alaskan culture. Here are some excursions you can get to experience:

  • Fishing
  • Flight seeing
  • Glacier viewing
  • Whale watching
  • Bear viewing
  • Gold panning
  • Railroads
  • Hiking
  • Northern lights
  • Museums
  • Shopping

photo via excursions.shorefox.com

MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE

From the pristine beaches and ancient ruins of the Eastern Mediterranean to the artsy and flavorful countries of the Western Mediterranean, this region is easily one of the most diverse in the world. Visit places likes Spain, France and Italy.Here are some excursions you can get to experience:

  • Island tours – visit ruins, museums
  • Ocean tours – snorkeling, canoeing, paddle boarding
  • Food Food Food! Try all kinds of cultural food
  • Beach
  • Trolley tours
  • Shopping
  • Did we mention food? and music of course!
www.pocruises.com

photo via pocruises.com

The decision may be too hard as all this sounds amazing! We recommend you doing both, one this year and one next year. Either way your experience will be once in a lifetime.

Tell us about your favorite cruise in the comments below.